Media Street: Latest news and rumours from AFL television, radio and newspapers

Patrick Dangerfield is everywhere in the AFL space. And it is believed he played a part in landing a media stalwart a new role.

Has champion Cat Patrick Dangerfield turned his hand to recruitment?

The Brownlow medallist is understood to have played a part in former longtime Geelong media stalwart Kevin Diggerson landing a new communications gig with the AFL Players’ Association.

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It means Diggerson will continue to work closely with the big Cat given Danger remains front and centre as the AFLPA president.

It comes as Collingwood locked in AFL media manager Nadine Rabah to head up its media department following the departure of Stephen Rielly.

Hawthorn has also seen a number of changes in recent months — former player Jackson Paine has taken a role under former state government PR guru Matt Dixon, while Stephanie Edwards is leaving Waverley and will be replaced by former Channel 9 producer Jake Keating.

Carla Monforte has moved into the media and PR manager role at Geelong.

Patrick Dangerfield has turned his hand to recruitment for the AFLPA Picture: Getty Images
Patrick Dangerfield has turned his hand to recruitment for the AFLPA Picture: Getty Images

Inside story of Gill’s viral image

Did we get a glimpse into the future this week - two very different faces of the AFL?

While acting chief executive Kylie Rogers fronted the media pack on Tuesday to explain the league’s embarrassing and bungled handling of a report into recruiting female umpires, a picture of her boss popped up online and became a social media sensation.

Gill was apparently spotted chatting with locals while attending the Jewish Montefiore Cemetery with friend Dan Rosen who is the Australasian President at Warner Music.

From all reports it was a rest day for the AFL chief while he’s away canvassing options for the highly anticipated next AFL TV rights deal.

“I did see that photo. Gill is a busy man, and he meets a lot of people. But I laughed because he’s recognisable anywhere in the world,” stand-in CEO Rogers explained on Tuesday.

“Frankly there’s footy fans everywhere in the world and someone captured that moment.

“He looked very engaged and it warmed my heart when I saw it.”

The picture of Gillon McLachlan in New York that quickly went viral. Picture: Supplied
The picture of Gillon McLachlan in New York that quickly went viral. Picture: Supplied

Media Street reckons Rogers might have felt more comforted had McLachlan instead been in Melbourne this week to throw himself on the umpire report grenade.

Still, her impressive performance in front of the cameras will stand her in good stead if her names continues to be bandied around as a possible replacement for the out-going Gill in the top job next year.

Has AFL’s news site ignored female ump story?

Speaking of the AFL and media, the league’s content arm has taken the unusual step of all but ignoring the existence of the explosive report into female umpiring - first revealed in the Herald Sun on Monday.

Not one journo or columnist has written a story for footy news website afl.com.au - which is strange because acting chief executive Kylie Rogers admitted yesterday the league could have been better served by releasing the document to the public earlier.

Rogers said the Herald Sun’s decision to make the report public on Monday would “no doubt” make community matches a safer place.

“On behalf of the game we apologise to any woman who suffers harassment or sexism of any kind and we would encourage them to report it to their local club, to their league or to the AFL itself,” Rogers said.

While they posted a link to the Rogers press conference and league statement, surely these words - heartfelt and coming from the top - are worthy of a stand-alone story?

Pies poach AFL’s media manager in coup

A rising star of the AFL is set to depart headquarters and take the reins of Collingwood’s media department.

League media manager Nadine Rabah has been appointed as the Magpies’ general manager of media and will begin at the AIA Centre on June 20.

Rabah, who is in her 10th year at the AFL, will travel to the US in three weeks to complete a Harvard Executive Leadership course after she was recently recognized with the Maureen Kerridge AM Scholarship.

Rabah is considered a diligent media operator among AFL circles after a rise through the ranks from umpiring to media management with a strong football knowledge to now be the youngest head of media in the competition.

“I was born and raised in the northern suburbs of Melbourne and growing up I always had a football in my hands,” she said when awarded the scholarship recently.

“I didn’t realise that my deep passion for the game would grant me the opportunities that I’ve been able to experience and for that I remain extremely grateful and forever humble.

“I aim to make a difference in football and, more importantly, use sport as a vehicle to connect with communities across the country.

Nadine Rabah will become the new Collingwood GM of media
Nadine Rabah will become the new Collingwood GM of media

“I am determined to progress the game on and off the field and pride myself on being a strong but fair leader who values hard work and honesty.”

Rabah takes on the Collingwood role after the Magpies parted ways with long time media and PR boss Stephen Rielly last month.

As a field umpire in 2015, Rabah detailed her deep love of the game and that she had been told as a young girl that she could no longer play football alongside her male counterparts.

Her parents allowed her to play on.

“I begged my dad and asked him what the difference was. I could play informally with my cousins, why couldn’t I play for a proper footy club?”,” Rabah told The Australian in 2015.

“I would go out there every week and try to prove them wrong, try to prove that girls could play football.

“I did get negative feedback from the community. I just wasn’t aware of it at the time.

“My dad did cop a lot of flak for letting his daughter play in a traditionally boys’ sport, so I am glad he was strong in that regard.”

Originally published as Media Street: Latest news and rumours from AFL television, radio and newspapers